Speed dating white plains ny

23-Jul-2020 04:07 by 5 Comments

Speed dating white plains ny

Published in 2008 to coincide with a landmark two-city exhibition in New York and Washington, D.C., this volume features extraordinary paintings, prints, sculptures, and photographs, along with thoughtful discussions of Scholder’s myth-shattering depictions of the Native American experience.

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Jewelry has long been an important form of artistic expression for Native peoples in the Southwest; its diversity of design reflects a long history of migrations, trade, and cultural exchange.

In this book, four scholars introduce important and little-known ceramic figures and vessels representing the cultures of the Andes, Mexico, the American Southwest, and the eastern United States.

Extensively illustrated with beautiful new photographs of objects from the museum’s collections, including many pieces published here for the first time, In this book, which grew out of a landmark NMAI symposium in 1995, Native and non-Native scholars and museum professionals explore issues concerning the representation of Indians and their cultures by museums in North America.

“In [this] memorable book, Indian people use words, actions, and artifacts to represent themselves as fully human, free at last from the soul-cramping and spirit-reducing tests of authenticity and purity.” For the first Americans, a record of the past is written in the objects that were a part of daily life.

Values, traditions, and beliefs are embodied in works of Native creativity, from children’s toys to leaders’ war shirts, and from Arctic kayaks to masks made by the people of Tierra del Fuego.

For more information, contact NMAI Publications at [email protected] All purchases support the NMAI's mission to advance knowledge and understanding of the Native cultures of the Western Hemisphere—past, present, and future—through partnership with Native peoples and others.

Respected singers, storytellers, artists, elders, and scholars from Native cultures throughout the Americas were invited to the museum to choose objects of personal meaning to them.Lushly illustrated with more than 150 never-before-published photographs, this retrospective represents the first major publication of Horace Poolaw's photography.Poolaw, a Kiowa Indian from Anadarko, Oklahoma, documented his community during a time of great change, witnessing with his camera the transformations that each decade of the twentieth century brought to his multi-tribal community.is an illustrated overview of the intricate sculptural jewelry created by Denise Wallace (Chugach Aleut) and her non-Native husband and partner, Samuel Wallace.The Wallace's innovative work using fossil ivory, silver, and richly colored stones explores a contemporary style that is rooted in the traditions of Denise's Chugach culture.Showcasing the powerful indigenous art of a region that spans national borders, the book provides readers with an understanding of the Anishinaabeg as contemporary citizens of North America with deep roots in their Great Lakes homeland.